Could vitamin D deficiency increase the risk of heart disease?

 | Post date: 2022/01/8 | 
  • Vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine” vitamin, is a fat-soluble vitamin that exists in two main forms: D-2 and D-3.
  • As an essential micronutrient and one that is primarily derived from sunlight, vitamin D is important for the development of bones and teeth and the regular functioning of the immune system.
  • Beyond these functions, previous studies suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and a higher likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease.
  • In a new study, researchers have established that it is worthwhile to check vitamin D levels when assessing a person’s cardiovascular risk.

Worldwide, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs)Trusted Source are one of the leading causes of death. Every year, an estimated 17.9 million people around the world die as a result of complications from heart diseases. For context, this means that CVDs are responsible for 32% of all deaths globally.

Prior studiesTrusted Source show that various factors — such as several health conditions, age, family history, diet, and lifestyle — combine to influence the risk of developing CVD.

Using a novel analytical approach, researchers in Australia have discovered an additional factor that may increase a person’s likelihood of CVD.

Lead author Prof. Elina Hyppönen, director of the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the University of South Australia Cancer Research Institute, outlined the results of the study for Medical News Today,

“We found evidence that vitamin D deficiency can increase blood pressure and the risk of CVD.”

“However,” she added, “increasing vitamin D concentrations will only be helpful for those participants who ‘need it,’ and further benefits from elevating concentrations beyond the nutritional requirement are going to be modest, if they exist.”

The results from the study appear in the European Heart Journal.




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